Temporal methods add to innovation

Conventional sensory methods often characterize products as if they are a static aggregation of attribute intensities. But it has long been recognized that many products have an important temporal component, and examples of this are seemingly limitless; consider that foods are chewed and broken down prior to swallowing with accompanying texture changes and flavour release, that carbonated beverages elicit numbing and prickling sensations in the mouth which attenuate with time, and that the skinfeel of many personal care products changes during application. More recently, methods such as temporal check-all-that-apply (TCATA) have been used to allow both trained assessors and consumers to describe samples continuously. This means that it is possible to investigate consumer hedonic clusters based on consumer liking data, and then to explore the temporal perceptions elicited within consumers clusters that are of interest. Continue reading Temporal methods add to innovation

Do panelists “monkey-pick” attributes in TDS studies and how relevant is it to know?

Dominance rates arising from temporal dominance of sensations (TDS) data are almost always plotted and understood with reference to chance and significance lines. Chance lines are fully determined by the number of attributes, and represent what we might expect if poor reading but task-engaged monkeys picked the attributes. Significance lines are conventionally based on the 95% upper confidence limit for chance, therefore relating to a null hypothesis of attribute monkey-picking. Continue reading Do panelists “monkey-pick” attributes in TDS studies and how relevant is it to know?

Understanding dynamic perceptions using Temporal check-all-that-apply (TCATA), Temporal dominance of sensations (TDS) and Progressive profile (PP): a case study with different fermented dairy products

To identify the sensory attributes that guide food choice, classical descriptive analyses are commonly used, however they do not take into account the dynamics involved during oral processing. The use of temporal methods provides more realistic information on the sensory changes during the time, approaching the consumers’ perception. Continue reading Understanding dynamic perceptions using Temporal check-all-that-apply (TCATA), Temporal dominance of sensations (TDS) and Progressive profile (PP): a case study with different fermented dairy products

Benefits and limitations with using Temporal Check-All-That-Apply (TCATA) with consumers to evaluate perceptually similar variants of a snack product

The present study was to determine if and how TCATA could discriminate two variants of the same snack (A, B) that had previously been demonstrated perceptually similar by consumer liking and diagnostics. Consumers evaluated five consecutive bites of each variant at McCormick & Co., Inc.: via temporal liking on Day 1, TCATA with 12 emotion attributes on Day 2, and TCATA with 9 sensory attributes on Day 3. 112 consumers attended all 3 evaluation days. Continue reading Benefits and limitations with using Temporal Check-All-That-Apply (TCATA) with consumers to evaluate perceptually similar variants of a snack product

Do teenaged chocolate-flavored cereal consumers go cuckoo trying to do TCATA while eating Cocoa Puffs?

The feelings, tastes, flavors, and sounds elicited by ready-to-eat breakfast cereals in the mouth are perceived dynamically, and evolve within each bite, and over the multi-bite eating experience. Temporal check-all-that-apply (TCATA) is a temporal sensory method that extends the use of check-all-that-apply questions by allowing continuous selection of attributes based on applicability or noticeability. TCATA can permit characterization of the consumer perception dynamics of products. Continue reading Do teenaged chocolate-flavored cereal consumers go cuckoo trying to do TCATA while eating Cocoa Puffs?

How do static and dynamic sensory product characterizations based on check-all-that-apply questions? Insights from three consumer studies

Temporal check-all-that-apply (TCATA) is basically an extension of CATA questions and measures the dynamics of sensory perception. Despite the similarities between both methodologies, no study has yet compared static and dynamic sensory product characterizations obtained with CATA and TCATA with consumers, respectively. Continue reading How do static and dynamic sensory product characterizations based on check-all-that-apply questions? Insights from three consumer studies

Escaping p-value land: The future of lean decision-making in sensory evaluation

This workshop explores current topics and trends in sensometrics, and includes engaging presentations, arguments, and a panel discussion. Focus is on general concepts rather than technical details, making the workshop of interest to a general audience with an introductory knowledge of statistics. Continue reading Escaping p-value land: The future of lean decision-making in sensory evaluation

Perceived healthfulness of foods and affective ambivalence

Today’s consumers have access to more food choices and nutritional information than ever before. While trying to navigate grocery stores they are making regular decisions of what foods best suit the taste, nutritional, economic and environmental needs of their lifestyle. The present study looks at the relationship between consumers’ perceived healthfulness of foods and their affective ambivalence pre and post consumption. Where ambivalence is determined via the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS) measuring the degree to which the subject expresses positive and negative attitudes simultaneously. Continue reading Perceived healthfulness of foods and affective ambivalence

Equivalence bounds for sensory applications based on consumer product evaluation

Equivalence testing is widely used in sensory science during all stages of product development and production. It is important to understand product differences and variations, some differences will go undetected by the consumer or will be considered “close enough” and therefore acceptable to the consumer. Continue reading Equivalence bounds for sensory applications based on consumer product evaluation

Perception of carbonation in sparkling wines using descriptive analysis (DA) and temporal check-all-that-apply (TCATA)

Several methods exist in order to profile complex matrices that change over time. In this study, two descriptive methodologies, descriptive analysis (DA) and temporal check-all-that-apply (TCATA) were used to analyze the complex perceptions associated with carbonation and compare the profiles from each method. Continue reading Perception of carbonation in sparkling wines using descriptive analysis (DA) and temporal check-all-that-apply (TCATA)

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